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British budget carrier Jet2 has elected to bill a disruptive passenger £85,000 after the flight she was on, headed to Turkey, had to return to London. The plane had to return to London Stansted due to the extreme actions of the passenger, Chloe Haines. It’s reported that she tried to storm the cockpit which prompted a hijack alert. British Royal Air Force fighter planes had to be scrambled in order to intercept the plane and accompany it back to London. The passenger also attempted to open the emergency door of the plane while the plane was in flight.

Steve Heapy, the CEO of Jet2, described the actions of Chloe Haines in the following statement, “Miss Haines’ behaviour was one of the most serious cases of disruptive passenger behaviour that we have experienced. She must now face up to the consequences of her actions, and we will vigorously pursue to recover the costs that we incurred“.

Haines was arrested upon arrival back in London. According to the UK’s Civil Aviation Authority, the number of disruptive passenger incidents has doubled since 2012. There is some suggestion that the rise in this type of incident is connected to the increase in alcohol sales on flights and in airports. Airlines have been criticised for not restricting how much alcohol passengers can buy. It has also been suggested by some airline workers that the airlines encourage them to sell as much alcohol as possible.

The British government is looking into whether airports should have to follow the same alcohol sales rules as pubs in the UK. Currently, airports are exempt from restrictions such as what time they can begin serving alcohol. Some airports are taking matters into their own hands to curb the drinking of certain passengers by refusing to sell alcohol to passengers who are already drunk. For airlines, there are still no official restrictions on selling or serving alcohol. Despite this, it is illegal for a person to be drunk on a plane. Some airlines are now putting drink limits and other restrictions in place to limit disruptive behaviour.

Difficult words

Elect (v): To choose to do something.

Cockpit (n): The part of an aircraft where the pilot sits and flies.

Hijack (v): To take control of something you shouldn’t.

Scramble (v): To order an aircraft to take off immediately.

Intercept (v): To prevent or stop something from happening.

Vigorously (adj): Involving a lot of strength or energy.

Incur (v): To suffer a consequence because of one’s own behaviour.

Pub (n): An establishment that sells alcohol and sometimes food.

Curb (v): To restrain or try to control.

Activities

For listening practise, listen to the recorded article here:

British English:

American English: 

Match the Synonym!

1. Elect A. Take over.
2. Cockpit B. Restrain
3. Hijack C. Strongly
4. Scramble D. Suffer
5. Intercept E. Pilot’s area.
6. Vigorously F. Bar
7. Incur G. Stop
8. Pub H. Decide
9. Curb I. Order an aircraft.

True or False?

1. The British airline Jet2 has given £85,000 to a passenger. T / F

2. The plane made it safely to Turkey. T / F

3. The disruptive passenger was a male. T / F

4. The passenger tried to infiltrate the cockpit.  T / F

5. The British Airforce had to get involved in the incident.T / F

6. The passenger tried to open the emergency plane door after it had landed. T / F

7. The CEO of Jet2 said that the airline would try to recover the costs of the incident. T / F

8. The number of disruptive passenger incidents has risen since 2012. T / F

9. No one has suggested that alcohol could be the cause of disruptive passengers. T / F

10. Some airports have begun restricting alcohol. T / F

Unscramble the sentence!

1. the / tried / storm / that / It’s / reported / she / to / cockpit

2. to / The / the / also / passenger / emergency / door / open / attempted

3. face / must / now / the / to / up / consequences / She

4. was / upon / London / arrested / back / Haines / arrival / in

5. exempt / Currently, / restrictions / from / airports / are

Listening and Vocabulary

Listen to the article and fill in the words OR practice vocabulary and fill in the words.

British English:

American English:

Encourage Attempted Pursue
Disruptive Fighter Statement
Alcohol Incident Restrictions

British budget carrier Jet2 has elected to bill a (1)_______________ passenger £85,000 after the flight she was on, headed to Turkey, had to return to London. The plane had to return to London Stansted due to the extreme actions of the passenger, Chloe Haines. It’s reported that she tried to storm the cockpit which prompted a hijack alert. British Royal Air Force (2)_________ planes had to be scrambled in order to intercept the plane and accompany it back to London. The passenger also (3)______________ to open the emergency door of the plane while the plane was in flight.

Steve Heapy, the CEO of Jet2, described the actions of Chloe Haines in the following (4)_____________, “Miss Haines’ behaviour was one of the most serious cases of disruptive passenger behaviour that we have experienced. She must now face up to the consequences of her actions, and we will vigorously (5)___________ to recover the costs that we incurred“.

Haines was arrested upon arrival back in London. According to the UK’s Civil Aviation Authority, the number of disruptive passenger incidents has doubled since 2012. There is some suggestion that the rise in this type of (6)_____________ is connected to the increase in alcohol sales on flights and in airports. Airlines have been criticised for not restricting how much alcohol passengers can buy. It has also been suggested by some airline workers that the airlines (7)______________ them to sell as much alcohol as possible.

The British government is looking into whether airports should have to follow the same alcohol sales rules as pubs in the UK. Currently, airports are exempt from (8)______________ such as what time they can begin serving alcohol. Some airports are taking matters into their own hands to curb the drinking of certain passengers by refusing to sell alcohol to passengers who are already drunk. For airlines, there are still no official restrictions on selling or serving (9)_____________. Despite this, it is illegal for a person to be drunk on a plane. Some airlines are now putting drink limits and other restrictions in place to limit disruptive behaviour.

Conversation Questions

Take turns speaking with a partner or try to answer on your own:

1. Did you find this article interesting? Why or why not?
2. Did you learn anything new from this article? If so, what?
3. What do you think of this story?
4. Have you ever had a bad experience on a plane?
5. Is alcohol popular in your country?
6. Are there any restrictions on alcohol in your country?
7. Are budget airlines popular in your country?
8. What punishment should this woman receive?
9. Is the airline right to send her a bill?
10. How can airlines stop this type of behaviour?
11. Should airlines sell alcohol?
12. How would you improve the flying experience?
13. Do you think alcohol is the reason for the rise in disruptive passengers?
14. Have you ever noticed any bad behaviour during a flight?
15. What do you usually do to keep busy on a flight?
16. Do you like to order alcohol on a flight?
17. What do you think about plane food?
18. Should airports have different rules than the country they are in?
19. Are pubs or bars popular in your country?
20. What is a popular place for people to “hang-out” together in your country?